Discover the secret to pain-free conversion
of your Lotus Notes and Domino data.
Call anytime USA toll free 1800 617 5409
Articles

Are Desktop Email Clients Better Than Webmail?

While software like Postbox, Sparrow and Lotus Notes are doing interesting things in the world of desktop email, other traditional players such as Thunderbird have recently announced that they won’t be developing for the area any more. This begs the question, is desktop email dying in the face of web mail client domination? Or is desktop email software, with all its bells and whistles, still the way forward? There is no definitive answer to this question. Each have their own advantages. Desktop email clients are always going to be a better option for those who have many email addresses and who wish to access them all in one interface. It’s also important if you want to have access to emails while you’re offline; you can’t get this with a web-based solution. Compatibility is always going to be an issue, however; in order to go from Lotus Notes to Microsoft Outlook, for example, you’ll need to convert NSF to PST.

Source: http://www.lifehacker.com.au/2012/07/ask-lh-should-i-use-a-desktop-email-client/

The Miracle of Cloud Computing

These days, cloud computing seems to be all the rage. But what is cloud computing? Is it beyond the understanding of the average person? Not at all, actually. In fact, cloud computing has been around for a long time, and though you may not have realised it, you’ve probably been using cloud-based services since you first connected to the Internet. Webmail clients, such as Gmail and Yahoo! Mail, for example, are cloud-based services. Social networking sites such as Facebook are cloud-based too. Or it could be software to help convert NSF to PST. Essentially, a cloud service is one that allows users to access applications and store data without having to install software on their own machines. All they need is an internet connection and a login. All information is hosted on remote servers or, as the metaphor goes, “in the cloud”. It’s only in recent times, as more and more cloud-based services have become available, that the term has gained traction.

Source: http://blogs.thenews.com.pk/blogs/2012/07/11/cloud-computing-nothing-less-than-magic/

The Problems with Cloud Computing at the Highest Level of Government

With the U.S. Government planning to move most of its operations into the cloud, it is discovering that doing so poses several problems. A number of these issues have been pinpointed. For starters, the average cloud vendor may not have the requisite understanding of security requirements at the highest level of government. Secondly, the government agencies won’t necessarily have the requisite knowledge to take advantage of cloud-based solutions. Thirdly, the government agencies may not be able to ensure cloud vendors do not pose a security risk in their own right. There are several others, too; for example, one of the most common problems facing any organisation using software as a service is that, if they need to change providers in the future, data may not be entirely interoperable. They may, for example, find that they need to convert NSF to PST, which can be a lengthy process. While progress is certainly being made, there are clearly still many obstacles.

Source: http://www.computerworld.com.au/article/430313/7_most_common_challenges_cloud_computing/?fp=4&fpid=78268965

Symphonical: The Google Plus App That Caught Google’s Attention

Bjorn Haugland is the CEO of Symphonical, an app that takes advantage of Google Plus Hangouts, allowing users to arrange a bunch of sticky notes in order to mimic the age old “writing on a whiteboard” tradition of business meetings. Haugland was excited enough when Google Product Manager, Amit Fulay, accepted his invitation to “hang out” on Google Plus so he could see Symphonical in action. But his excitement levels went through the roof when Fulay showed his approval of the app by writing, “I love this interface” on one of the app’s very own sticky notes. Now, Symphonical is a Google Plus feature app. It’s just one of many apps that have taken advantage of the new platform. However, despite its many strengths, Symphonical still struggles to integrate with other applications; much like Lotus Notes users who need to convert NSF to PST to use Microsoft Outlook, Symphonical users may struggle to achieve integration with other software until the kinks are ironed out.

Source: http://www.computerworld.com.au/article/429044/enterprise_collaboration_app_earns_google_spotlight/?fp=4&fpid=1398720840#closeme

Thunderbird Isn’t Go: Mozilla’s Email Client Calls it Quits

Any Lotus Notes users that were planning on converting to Mozilla Thunderbird may need to start thinking about converting from Notes to Outlook instead, as Mozilla recently announced that its much loved email and news client has arrived at its final stage of active development. This isn’t to say that Thunderbird will not be available at all any more; on the contrary, Mozilla will continue to focus on maintaining a stable product and dealing with any security threats that may arise. And the latest version (13.0.1) will not be the last, either — at least two more versions, which have already completed development, will be released later in the year. With that said, Mozilla has stated that its priorities can now be found in other areas. For Microsoft, this news will likely strengthen the position of Outlook, its default email client that comes with Windows, in the long term.

Source: http://thedroidguy.com/2012/07/mozilla-stops-development-works-on-thunderbird/

Microsoft Criticised for Cherry Picking Start-Ups

One of the world’s largest IT companies, Microsoft, has been criticised in some quarters for having ulterior motives as relates to its BizSpark program. BizSpark provides either free or low-cost Microsoft software, mentorship and marketing for various IT start-ups that have been in existence for less than three years. The criticism has emerged because it is claimed that Microsoft’s goal is to pigeonhole start-ups into developing using Microsoft software — which may involve NSF to PST conversion — instead of open source tools or otherwise. Adding fuel to the fire is the fact that Microsoft has bought out many of its BizSpark companies once they began to make progress. Microsoft’s Vice President of Emerging Business, Dan’l Lewin, says any buy-outs are the result of discovering brilliant entrepreneurs or developers with whom Microsoft would like to partner, but it’s far from the company’s primary goal when it comes to the BizSpark program.

Source: http://www.smh.com.au/it-pro/business-it/mentorship-also-a-way-to-find-partners-microsoft-20120710-21t3o.html

Dangerous Office for Mac Bug Exterminated by Microsoft

While Macs are generally understood to be more secure than PCs due to the fact that most malicious software developers target the larger PC market, a vulnerability in Microsoft’s Office for Mac software was recently discovered — and closed — by the company. Essentially, this bug worked by allowing a user to download a malicious program that could allow a different user on the same system to gain access. It’s the kind of thing that could cause issues in multi-user environments, such as office computer networks or university computer labs. It’s the kind of bug that could strike at any time, whether a user is converting NSF to PST or simply browsing the Web. Office for Mac users should be able to download the update automatically through regular software update checks. There are several other potential security issues that were fixed with the update, including some relating to SkyDrive and IMAP configurations.

Source: http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13727_7-57470135-263/microsoft-squashes-bugs-with-office-for-mac-update/

Is the Image of the Lone Coder a Myth?

In the world of modern computing, there seems to be a heavy focus on the work of individuals, or “lone coders”, when it comes to building advanced software. Bill Gates and Microsoft, Steve Jobs and Apple, Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook — these are all examples. This image is perpetuated by media and creates a notion that the “next big thing” in the world of software may emerge one night in a college dorm with nothing more than the coding genius of one individual. According to Brian Fitzpatrick and Ben Collins-Sussman, who wrote the book Team Geek, this view is a myth; in reality, 99 per cent of the world’s advanced software, whether it’s a social networking website or a tool to help convert NSF to PST, is the result of team-based collaboration and, often, months (and even years) of development. While these teams need strong leaders with excellent knowledge and vision, it’s only with many skilled hands that modern software developers have the greatest chance of success.

Source: http://www.forbes.com/sites/oreillymedia/2012/07/11/coding-myths-and-the-need-for-collaboration/

The Importance of Unified Communications & Collaboration Revealed

As an increasingly mobile workforce becomes more reliant on a range of mobile technologies and devices in order to operate on a day-to-day basis, a better understanding of the Unified Communications & Collaboration (UCC) is essential. COMMfusion LLC, in association with UC Strategies, recently released the Unified Communications & Collaboration Market 2011-2016 report, which features in-depth data on UCC technologies, challenges, trends, forecasts and more. It highlights the fact that, in an increasingly mobile world, once difficult conversion processes such as converting NSF to PST can be handled with ease; the provision of a consistent and unified user interface needs to be the new goal. The study finds that, in 2011, the total UC-capable market reached $12.23 billion, and forecasts that it could surpass 20 billion by 2016. It also differentiates between the UC-capable market and what it terms the “true” UCC market and can help vendors to understand the opportunities that lie ahead.

Source: http://www.marketwatch.com/story/landmark-study-on-unified-communications-collaboration-where-it-is-and-where-its-going-2012-07-11

Are the Major Social Networking Companies Failing?

Lotus Notes was an early social networking attempt that failed because IBM, the company that created it, didn’t have a basic understanding of its market. As a result, Notes is becoming increasingly irrelevant, and many users are having to convert from NSF to PST to continue accessing old emails. In more recent times, companies such as Facebook and Google have been far more successful with their own social networking endeavours, but some would argue that they too look doomed to fail in the long run, despite all of their success. The argument is that this is because the executives at these firms don’t have a proper understanding of advertising, and in reality, that’s the business these companies are in. After all, that’s where most of their money comes from. If Facebook and Google don’t realise this, then perhaps they are doomed to fail as well.

Source: http://www.technewsworld.com/story/The-Dirty-Suicidal-Secret-of-Facebook-75570.html